Thank you for your interest in Community Project Funding for Fiscal Year 2023. 


You may read a comprehensive guide about the Community Project Funding process here.


COMMUNITY PROJECT FUNDING (CPF):

CPF is an annual process that allows Members of Congress to request direct funding for projects that benefit the communities they represent. The initiative entails stringent eligibility, ethics, and transparency guardrails and is only available to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as some non-profits. Additionally, only projects with evidence of strong support from the community will be considered, and evidence of this support and community need is required as part of your submission. 

GUIDELINES AND SUBMISSIONS:

Please check the below guidelines and requirements before applying. 

  • The deadline to submit a Community Project Funding request is April 19, 2022 by 5:00 pm EDT

  • Please submit all FY 2023 Community Project Funding requests through this form.

For specific questions, please reach out to my staff by emailing GottheimerAppropriations@mail.house.gov. You may also contact Shay Battle in my Glen Rock Office at 201-389-1100 with any questions.

You may read a comprehensive guide about the Community Project Funding process here.

COMMUNITY PROJECT FUNDING ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

The following requirements apply to all CPF requests:

1. There is a ban on directing Community Project Funding to for-profit grantees. Members of Congress may request funding for State or local governmental grantees and for eligible nonprofits.

2. Each project request must be for FY2023 funds only and cannot include multi-year funding.

ETHICS AND TRANSPARENCY REQUIREMENTS:

The following requirements apply to all CPF requests:

1. Each Member may only submit 15 CPF projects to the Appropriations Committee for consideration. Of those 15, not all 15 will be successfully funded. If your project is one of the 15 submitted, the full details of your request (including the information provided below) are required to be posted publicly online on this website.

2. The Government Accountability Office will conduct a mandatory audit of a sample of enacted community project funding and report its findings to Congress. This report will likely be made public at some point.

3. A Member, their spouse, and immediate family may not have any financial interest in the project.

ADDITIONAL DISCLOSURES

Please also note that because Community Project Funding is an evolving initiative, additional requirements or needed information may be added at a later date. Our office will reach out to you directly if you have submitted a request for which additional information is needed.

ELIGIBLE APPROPRIATIONS ACCOUNTS FOR COMMUNITY PROJECT FUNDING

Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies

Five accounts in this category are eligible for CPF:

  • Agricultural Research Service, Buildings and Facilities: The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) owns and operates laboratories and facilities across the United States. Many of these laboratories/facilities are decades old, have outlived their functional life span, and are badly in need of major repairs, renovation, or replacement. Facility requests must be for ARS-owned facilities or for facilities that will enhance ongoing ARS work. Requests can assist in the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture.

  • Rural Development, Rural Community Facility Grants: Grants to purchase, construct, or improve essential community facilities, to purchase equipment, and pay other related project expenses. Essential community facilities include, but are not limited to, healthcare facilities, public facilities, public safety measures, educational services, or other community support services. Examples of eligible projects include medical or dental clinics, towns halls, courthouses, childcare centers, police or fire departments, public works vehicles, or distance learning equipment. Any project must serve a rural area as specified in 7 CFR 3570.53 (rural areas including cities, villages, townships and Federally Recognized Tribal lands with no more than 20,000 residents), and the Member’s request must demonstrate community support.

The Community Facilities program has a cost share calculated on a graduated scale. The applicant should be aware of any cost share as documented in 7 CFR 3570.63(b). Applicant shall certify they cannot finance the project from their own resources and credit is not otherwise available on reasonable terms from non-Federal sources. 

  • Rural Utilities Service, ReConnect Grants: ReConnect broadband pilot grants facilitate broadband deployment in rural areas. Grants funds can be used for the costs of construction, improvement, or acquisition of facilities and equipment needed to provide broadband service to rural areas without sufficient broadband access. The area must be rural and lack sufficient access to broadband service. A rural area is any area which is not located within a city, town, or incorporated area that has a population of greater than 20,000 inhabitants. Sufficient access to broadband is defined as greater than 90% of any rural area in which households have fixed, terrestrial broadband service delivering at least 25 Mbps downstream and 3 Mbps upstream. Mobile and satellite services will not be considered in making the determination of sufficient access to broadband.

  • Rural Utilities Service, Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grants: The Distance Learning and Telemedicine program (DLT) helps rural residents better utilize the enormous potential of modern telecommunications and the internet for education and healthcare, two critical components of economic and community development. The DLT program helps rural communities acquire the technology and training necessary to connect educational and medical professionals with students, teachers, and patients in rural areas. Grants may be used for audio and video equipment, broadband facilities that support distance learning or telemedicine (not actual broadband), computer hardware or network components/software, and acquisition of instructional programming.

All requests are subject to all the regulations governing the program which can be found at 7 CFR Part 1734.   The program requires a 15% match that cannot come from another federal source.

  • Natural Resources Conservation Service, Conservation Operations: The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) supports private landowners, conservation districts, and other organizations to conserve, maintain, and improve the Nation’s natural resources. Conservation Operations has four major program components: Conservation Technical Assistance, Soil Survey, Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting, and Plant Materials Centers. Examples of specific objectives include reducing soil erosion, improving soil health, enhancing water supplies, improving water quality, increasing wildlife habitat, and reducing damage caused by floods and other natural disasters. Due to the newness of the urban agriculture program, the subcommittee will not consider such proposals this year as part of CPFs in Conservation Operations.

Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

The Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies will accept community project funding requests in the following accounts:

  • Department of Commerce; National Institute of Standards and Technology; Scientific and Technical Research and Services: Funding must be for activities consistent with and supportive of NIST’s mission and within its authorities, such as STEM education activities, scientific research, or other activities that support American manufacturing and industry.

  • Department of Commerce; National Institute of Standards and Technology; Construction of Research Facilities: This account funds the construction and renovation of research facilities, provided that such facilities will be used in a manner that is aligned with and supportive of the mission of NIST. 

  • Department of Commerce; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Operations, Research, and Facilities: Community project funding for NOAA will only be considered within the Operations, Research, and Facilities account. This account does not fund construction projects, and as such, any such requests will not be considered. Requests for funding will be considered for research, demonstration, or education projects performed by external partners or for prioritizing NOAA internal funds for geographically specific projects. Any such project must be aligned with NOAA’s mission and within their existing authorities.

  • Department of Justice; Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (JAG): Office of Justice Programs, Byrne JAG Grants assist state, local, and tribal law enforcement efforts to prevent crime, improve the criminal justice system, provide victims’ services, and other related activities. Community projects funded under this category must comply with the requirements cited in JAG statutes and be consistent with Justice Department guidance for the program. Below are the links to the Department’s guidance and frequently asked questions regarding Byrne-JAG:

https://bja.ojp.gov/program/jag/overview https://bja.ojp.gov/sites/g/files/xyckuh186/files/media/document/jag‐faqs.pdf

The Committee encourages community project funding designed to help improve police-community relations. Historically, the Committee has not funded building construction or renovation as part of community project funding under this account. 

  • Department of Justice; Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Technology and Equipment:  Funding will be provided for COPS Technology and Equipment (COPS Tech) community project grants for State, local, and tribal law enforcement to develop and acquire effective technologies and interoperable communications that assist in investigating, responding to, and preventing crime, provided that such equipment meets the applicable requirements of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES).

This funding will allow recipients the opportunity to establish and enhance any of a variety of technical equipment and/or programs to encourage the continuation and enhancement of community policing efforts within their jurisdictions. These projects should help improve police effectiveness and the flow of information among law enforcement agencies, local government service providers, and the communities they serve.

  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); Safety, Security and Mission Services: Community project funding under the NASA Safety, Security, and Mission Services (NASA-SSMS) account must be for activities consistent with and supportive of the work of NASA’s mission directorates and within the agency’s authorities, such as STEM education activities and scientific research. Funding for building construction or renovation projects will not be considered for community project funding. 

Defense

Five accounts in this category are eligible for CPF:

  • Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Army: CPF from this account may be used to enhance the Army’s scientific and technical knowledge through research, development, test, and evaluation funded by the Department of Defense (DOD) and performed by industry, universities, federal laboratories, and others. Please note that the most likely recipients of funds from this account will be universities conducting research with a DOD element.

  • Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Navy: CPF from this account may be used to enhance the Navy’s scientific and technical knowledge through research, development, test, and evaluation funded by DOD and performed by industry, universities, federal laboratories, and others. Please note that the most likely recipients of funds from this account will be universities conducting research with a DOD element. 

  • Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Air Force: CPF from this account may be used to enhance the Air Force’s scientific and technical knowledge through research, development, test, and evaluation funded by DOD and performed by industry, universities, federal laboratories, and others. Please note that the most likely recipients of funds from this account will be universities conducting research with a DOD element.

  • Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Space Force: CPF from this account may be used to enhance the Space Force’s scientific and technical knowledge through research, development, test, and evaluation funded by DOD and performed by industry, universities, federal laboratories, and others. Please note that the most likely recipients of funds from this account will be universities conducting research with a DOD element.

  • Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Defense-Wide: CPF from this account may be used to enhance DOD’s scientific and technical knowledge through research, development, test, and evaluation funded by the Department of Defense (DOD) and performed by industry, universities, federal laboratories, and others. Please note that the most likely recipients of funds from this account will be universities conducting research with a DOD element.

Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies

The Subcommittee will only consider CPF requests in the following accounts and areas:

  • Corps of Engineers: Investigations

  • Corps of Engineers: Construction

  • Corps of Engineers: Mississippi River and Tributaries

  • Corps of Engineers: Operation and Maintenance

  • Bureau of Reclamation: Water and Related Resources

  • Department of Energy, including the following topics: energy efficiency, renewable energy, sustainable transportation, cybersecurity, energy security, emergency response, electricity, energy storage, nuclear energy, fossil energy, carbon management, critical minerals

Financial Services and General Government

Only the following accounts in the FSGG appropriations bill will be open for community project requests:

  • General Services Administration, Federal Buildings Fund - New Construction, Major Repairs and Alterations and Basic Repairs Accounts: Projects are limited to line items in the GSA Federal Buildings Fund requested by the Administration in either the FY22 or FY23 budget request. This account was not eligible for community project funding in the House in FY22 but was eligible for community project funding in the Senate. The awards in FY22 ranged from $500,000 to $50 million. Note that the Committee may consider a similar project range for FY23, and any caps will be determined by the Chair after reviewing the full universe of requests.

  • National Archives and Records Administration, National Historical Publications and Records Commission: Projects that help ensure online public discovery and use of historical records collections, encourage public engagement with historical records, strengthen the nation’s archival network, or publish documentary editions of historical records. Generally, projects should comply with the eligibility requirements for existing National Historical Publications and Records Commission grants programs as specified at https://www.archives.gov/nhprc/apply/eligibility.html. This account was not eligible for community project funding in the House in FY22 but was eligible for equivalent funding in the Senate. The average award in FY22 was just under $500,000. Note that the Committee may consider slightly higher project amounts for FY23, and any caps will be determined by the Chair after reviewing the full universe of requests.

  • Small Business Administration, Small Business Initiatives: Projects in support of small businesses, including but not limited to entrepreneur training, workforce development, counseling, research, and construction or acquisition of facilities. The average award in this account for FY22 was $650,000. Note the Committee may consider slightly higher project amounts for FY23, and any caps will be determined by the Chair after reviewing the full universe of requests.

Homeland Security

The Subcommittee on Homeland Security will accept Community Project Funding requests for only the following Federal Emergency Management Agency—Federal Assistance accounts:

  • Pre-Disaster Mitigation grants: Only projects that meet the requirements detailed in the most recent Notice of Funding Opportunity for the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) grant program will be considered for funding, including the cost-share requirement and environmental and historic preservation requirements, as applicable. For any projects designated for funding in the final fiscal year 2023 Homeland Security Appropriations Act, the state agency responsible for administering mitigation grants in the requestor’s state must submit an application to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and that entity will serve as the administrative agent for the grant. Therefore, all project proposals must be accompanied by a letter of support from the appropriate state agency affirming that it believes the project is eligible.

  • Emergency Operations Center grants: Only projects that meet the requirements detailed in the most recent Notice of Funding Opportunity for the Emergency Operations Center Grant Program, including the cost-share requirement and environmental and historic preservation requirements, as applicable, will be considered for funding. For any projects designated for funding in the final fiscal year 2023 Homeland Security Appropriations Act, the respective state administrative agency (SAA) must submit an application to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and that agency will serve as the administrative agent for the grant. Therefore, all project proposals must be accompanied by a letter of support from the appropriate SSA affirming that it believes the project is eligible.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies

The Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies will accept project requests in the following accounts:

  • Save America’s Treasures historic preservation projects within the National Park Service: The Save America’s Treasures grant program is for preservation and/or conservation work on nationally significant collections and historic properties. The SAT program falls under the purview of the Historic Preservation Fund account and was established in 1998 to celebrate America's premier cultural resources in the new millennium (Public Law 113–287, Section 308902, 128 Stat. 3244; 54 USC 3089 et seq.). The existing competitive grant program funds two categories of projects: awards managed by the National Park Service (NPS) for preservation projects at properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places for national significance or designated a National Historic Landmark; and awards managed by the Institute of Museum and Library Services for projects involving nationally significant collections (including artifacts, museum collections, documents, sculptures, and other works of art).

All SAT grants require a dollar‐for‐dollar non‐federal matching share. Recipients of any SAT project funded in the Interior bill must be able to match the amount provided.

  • Federal land acquisitions through the Land and Water Conservation Fund: Federal acquisition of lands and water and interests therein must be for the purpose of land and habitat conservation and the encouragement of outdoor recreation, as established by the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Act of 1965. Land acquisition project requests funded from the LWCF should be requested through the agency that would manage the land being acquired. The four land management agencies are: within the Department of the Interior, (1) the Bureau of Land Management, (2) the Fish and Wildlife Service, (3) the National Park Service; and within the Department of Agriculture, (4) the Forest Service.

  • Environmental Protection Agency State and Tribal Assistance Grants for certain water infrastructure projects: The vast majority of requests made to the Interior Subcommittee are for STAG infrastructure grants. These grants fund local wastewater and drinking water infrastructure projects. This includes construction of and modifications to municipal sewage treatment plants and drinking water treatment plants. Similar to past practice, the Committee will be limiting STAG infrastructure grants only to projects that are publicly-owned or owned by a non-profit entity and that are otherwise eligible for the funding from that state’s Clean Water or Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF) loan programs. Members should use the range of House and Senate project amounts funded in FY22 as a general guide when making requests. In FY22, the majority of EPA STAG infrastructure projects funded in the House bill ranged from $60,000 - $3,500,000, though there were a handful of exceptions. Note that the Committee may consider higher project amounts for FY23, and any caps will be determined by the Chair after reviewing the full universe of requests.

There is a minimum 20% cost share requirement for any portion of a project funded through a STAG infrastructure grant. For example, a $1 million project could receive a maximum of $800,000 from the Federal government, with the remaining $200,000 the responsibility of the grantee. In almost all cases, other federal funds cannot be used to meet this 20% cost share.

  • Certain State and Private Forestry projects within the U.S. Forest Service: The State and Private Forestry (S&PF) account provides technical and financial assistance, usually through the network of State Foresters, to improve the management, protection , and utilization of the Nation’s forests. Community projects are usually limited and include various specific urban and community forestry projects and specific forest disease or pest treatment areas. Members may also request specific State fire assistance projects or specific forestry assistance projects in this account.

State and Private Forestry projects are required to meet the 1:1 matching requirement mandated by the Forest Service. Keep this in mind when considering the amount being requested for the project. The amount being requested can be no more than half of the total project cost to account for matching funds being used (ex. If a project has been calculated to cost $200,000, then a request for a CPF can be no more than $100,000 for that project to allow for 1:1 matching funds to be used.) Additionally, project amounts should be to the nearest thousand (ex. $100,000 instead of $100,500).

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies 

The Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies will accept project requests in the following accounts:

  • Department of Labor—Employment and Training Administration—Training and Employment Services: The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act demonstration program is the only Labor Department program that supports community project funding. Community project funding is designated under Training and Employment Services. 

These projects must meet all statutorily mandated requirements, except that they are exempt from the requirement to compete. In addition, all projects must:

1) Include direct services to individuals to enhance employment opportunities;

  • 2)  Demonstrate evidence of a linkage with the State or local workforce investment system; and

  • 3)  Include an evaluation component.

Equipment purchases may be included within community project funding only as an incidental part of the entire project. A similar standard applies to curriculum development, which should be incidental to the project’s emphasis on direct services to individuals. Community project funding cannot be used for construction or renovation of facilities.

  • Department of Health and Human Services—Health Resources and Services Administration—Program Management: Grants to help with the cost of construction, renovation, or capital equipment for facilities for provision of health, mental health, or substance abuse services, training of health professionals, or medical research. Examples of eligible facilities include hospitals; health centers and clinics; skilled nursing facilities; mental health centers; facilities for schools of medicine, nursing or other health professions; and medical research laboratories.

In addition to construction and renovation, grants can be used to acquire capital equipment, such as lab equipment, x‐ray machines, and telehealth and information technology equipment. Equipment‐only grants—that is, grants not involving construction—are permissible (and commonly done). Generally, any equipment having a useful life of more than one year and a unit cost of at least $5,000 will be eligible as capital equipment. In addition, equipment with lower costs may also be eligible, provided that it is treated as an item of capital expense under the recipient institution’s pre‐existing, written accounting policies. One-time equipment expenses for health information systems and electronic medical records systems are permitted expenditures. The costs of expendable supplies such as pharmaceuticals, lab chemicals, or office paper are not eligible.

  • Department of Health and Human Services—Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration—Health Surveillance and Program Support: Community project funding through SAMHSA provides resources for substance use and/or mental health services — including prevention, harm reduction, treatment, or recovery support services.

Generally, SAMHSA projects cover:

  • Evidence-based substance use disorder and/or mental health treatment services.

  • Evidence-based harm reduction activities.

  • Crisis services, including 24-hour mobile crisis teams.

  • Suicide prevention activities including awareness training, screening, referral to treatment, as well as postvention activities.

  • Recovery support services, which includes case management, outreach, peer recovery mentors, peer support specialists, childcare, training, transportation, and housing, as well as helping individuals to navigate these various services.

  • Screening and assessment of individuals, including the presence of co-occurring mental and substance use disorders and referral to treatment.

  • Referral and access to treatment services.

  • Educational materials on substance misuse, HIV prevention, hepatitis prevention, and mental health promotion.

  • Practitioners or community members training on evidence-based behavioral health practices.

  • FDA-approved medications for the treatment of opioid use disorders in combination with comprehensive psychosocial services, including counseling, behavioral therapies, recovery support services, and other clinically appropriate services.

  • Projects that support the hiring of behavioral health providers.

  • Limited indirect costs that are directly related to the projects. 


  • Department of Health and Human Services—Administration for Children and Families—Children and Families Services Programs: Community project funding within ACF should be submitted through the Children and Families Services Programs account and must fall under one of the following categories:

  • Child Abuse Prevention — Community project funding may be used for projects to improve the prevention, assessment, identification, and treatment of child abuse and neglect through research, model service improvement, information dissemination, and technical assistance. Projects must serve or target children and families who are at risk or who have experienced child abuse and neglect. 

  • Social Services Research and Demonstration — Community project funding may be used for projects to promote the ability of families to thrive through financial self-sufficiency in order to prevent and reduce poverty and to promote the healthy development and greater well-being of children and families. Projects can serve a diverse population including: low-income individuals, children, youth, families, individuals with developmental disabilities, and Native Americans.

  • Department of Health and Human Services—Administration for Community Living—Aging and Disability Services Programs: Community project funding may be used for projects to improve or create new opportunities for older adults, individuals of all ages with disabilities, and their eligible family caregivers, to live independently and participate fully in their communities. Generally, community project funding should focus on improving access to, or the quality of, education, health services, training, support services, and independent living services for older adults, individuals with disabilities, and eligible family caregivers.

  • Department of Education—Innovation and Improvement: Community project funding for elementary and secondary education should be submitted through the Innovation and Improvement account. Elementary and secondary education community project funding includes instructional services, afterschool centers, curricula development, teacher training, acquisition of books and computers, arts education, social and emotional learning activities, full-service community schools, and early childhood education. In general, the focus of elementary and secondary education community project funding should be providing early childhood or K‐12 educational services.

Community project funding to provide and improve special education services at the elementary and secondary levels are also eligible under elementary and secondary education. Community project funding may include early intervention services for infants and toddlers, transition services, and postsecondary education services.

  • Department of Education—Higher Education: Community project funding can be designated under this heading for a wide variety of higher education projects. Generally, community project funding should focus on improving access to, or the quality of, postsecondary education. Community project funding cannot be used for construction or renovation of academic buildings, except in the case of minor remodeling required as part of technology upgrades.

Examples of the types of projects that can be funded under FIPSE include projects to hire and train faculty, establish and improve degree programs, improve teacher preparation programs, develop and improve curricula, upgrade technology and telecommunications, acquire science laboratory equipment, provide student support, implement university partnerships with school districts, and establish research and training centers.

Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

Department of Defense - Military Construction Accounts: The following types of projects are eligible to be considered for community project funding, provided that they comply with the specified guidelines listed below. The subcommittee will not consider requests for community projects unless they appear on a list provided to Congress by the Secretary of Defense or his/her designee. More detail regarding such lists can be found below.

  • Construction and Unspecified Minor Construction – Active Components: Eligible community project requests include both construction and unspecified minor military construction projects for active components. An unspecified minor military construction project is a project that has an approved cost equal to or less than $6,000,000. The types of projects under this heading include construction, installation, equipment of temporary or permanent public works, military installations, and facilities for the accounts listed below:

    • Army

    • Navy and Marine Corps

    • Air Force

    • Space Force

    • Defense-Wide Agencies (Special Operations Command (SOCOM), Defense
      Logistics Agency (DLA), etc.)

  • Construction and Unspecified Minor Construction – Reserve Components: Eligible community project requests include both construction and unspecified minor military construction projects for Reserve Components. An unspecified minor military construction project is a project that has an approved cost equal to or less than $6,000,000. Some Reserve Component projects require a State funding match. Requesting offices must determine whether the proposed project requires such a match and if so, confirm that the project has current State match funding before the request can be considered. The types of projects under this heading include construction, expansion, rehabilitation, and conversion of facilities for training and administration for the accounts listed below:

    • Army National Guard

    • Air National Guard

    • Army Reserve

    • Navy Reserve

    • Air Force Reserve

  • Planning and Design: Planning and design funding can be requested for specific projects when they are not yet at 35 percent design and therefore ineligible for construction funding. The types of projects under this heading include improving facility resilience, study, planning, design, and architect and engineer services for the accounts listed below:

    • Army

    • Navy and Marine Corps

    • Air Force

    • Space Force

    • Defense-Wide Agencies (SOCOM, DHA, etc.) ➢ Army National Guard

    • Air National Guard

    • Army Reserve

    • Navy Reserve

    • Air Force Reserve

Department of Veterans Affairs: The following information outlines the type of projects that are eligible to be considered for community project funding, provided that they comply with the specified guidelines listed below. The subcommittee will not consider requests for community projects unless they appear on VA’s 2023 Construction SCIP List.

  • VA has three types of construction projects: Major Construction (projects that are expected to cost above $20,000,000), Minor Construction (projects that are expected to cost equal to or less than $20,000,000), and Nonrecurring Maintenance (NRM) (projects that consist of upkeep, construction and maintaining building systems). The classification of each construction project is determined by VA.

  • Community project funding requests are eligible ONLY for VA Minor Construction projects. VA’s Minor Construction program includes capital projects with costs equal to or less than $20,000,000, particularly projects that construct new space instead of renovating existing space. Examples may include expanding existing facility square footage to provide additional healthcare capacity, construction of specialty care buildings or clinics, building of parking structures, or expanding gravesite space at cemeteries.

The Committee will only consider projects that appear on VA’s Integrated Department- wide Priority List for 2023 Construction Projects (2023 Construction SCIP List). This list will be included in the FY 2023 President’s Budget submission.

Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies 

Four accounts in the THUD appropriations bill will be open for community project funding requests:

  • Department of Transportation – Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Projects for enhancing airport safety, capacity, and security, and mitigating environmental concerns in accordance with sections 47101 to 47175 of title 49, United States Code, and FAA policy and guidance.

  • Department of Transportation – Highway Infrastructure Projects: Highway capital projects eligible under title 23 of the United States Code. Eligible projects are described under Section 133(b) of title 23, United States Code and generally include roughly one million miles of Federal-aid highways, bridges on any public road, and transit capital projects. Tribal and territorial capital projects authorized under Chapter 2 of title 23, United States Code, are also eligible.

  • Department of Transportation – Transit Infrastructure Projects: Transit capital projects eligible under chapter 53 of title 49 of the United States Code. Public transportation or transit is defined in Section 5302(15) and (22) of title 49, United States Code, as regular, continuing shared-ride surface transportation that is open to the general public or open to a segment of the general public defined by age, disability, or low income, and does not include intercity passenger rail transportation, intercity bus service, charter bus service, school bus service, sightseeing service, courtesy shuttle service for patrons of one or more specific establishments, or intra-terminal or intra-facility shuttle services.


Department of Housing and Urban Development – Economic Development Initiative (EDI): EDI community project funding may be used for economic and community development activities, including land or site acquisition, demolition or rehabilitation of housing or facilities, construction and capital improvements of public facilities (including water and sewer facilities), and public services. Requests may also include planning and other activities consistent with previously funded activities eligible under the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program (title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.)), unless otherwise specified. EDI community project funding is not eligible for the reimbursement of expenses for activities or costs incurred prior to the obligation of funds, if such activities are not eligible under the CDBG program. Capital and operating expenses for fire and police stations are not eligible for EDI community project funding.

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FY2023 APPROPRIATIONS COMMUNITY PROJECT FUNDING SUBMISSIONS

Project Name: Cooper’s Pond Improvements

Proposed Recipient: Borough of Bergenfield, NJ

Address of Recipient: 198 North Washington Avenue, Bergenfield, New Jersey, 07621

Description of the Project: The Borough of Bergenfield is requesting $1,000,000 in Community Project Funding to complete a range of improvements to Cooper’s Pond. Cooper’s Pond is a scenic park within the Borough that houses several historic landmarks and is a major community hub within Bergenfield. Cooper’s Pond is popular amongst residents of the community and sees frequent use as a location where passive recreational activities can be enjoyed. Due to the constant use of Cooper’s Pond for community gatherings and recreational activities, the park’s infrastructure has become worn down. For example, the pathways that allow residents to traverse the park are currently in poor condition, featuring cracks and uneven surfaces, and pose a safety hazard to residents who utilize them. 

The proposed improvements include the dredging of Cooper’s Pond, the beautification of the pond and park facilities, the installation of a sprinkler system, drainage improvements, the renovation of park bathrooms, the renovation of the Field House, and the resurfacing of park walkways. The dredging of the park will assist in preserving the iconic pond that gives the park its name. Cooper’s Pond is in urgent need of dredging, as the last time it was dredged was 20 years ago. The buildup of sediment in the pond has reduced the water level within the pond as it is slowly drying it up. The other improvements outlined in this request will address park infrastructure that is in need of renovation. The planting of new bushes and shrubbery and the installation of a sprinkler system will improve the overall aesthetic of the park and help to maintain the newly planted shrubs and bushes. The renovation of the Field Houses’ bathroom will provide residents with updated and improved bathroom facilities and the additional improvements will help the building to better facilitate community gatherings. Finally, the repaving of the park’s walkways will ensure that residents of all ages and abilities can safely traverse the park.

Federal Request: $1,000,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Construction of Community Center

Proposed Recipient: Borough of Allendale, NJ

Recipient Address: 500 West Crescent Avenue, Allendale, New Jersey 07401

Description of the Project: The Borough of Allendale is proposing to build a community center that will provide much-needed meeting space, a gymnasium, recreational space, a kitchen area, and an attached outdoor covered gathering space. The 220 West Crescent Avenue property is centrally located and once completed, the center will serve as a cornerstone to our community, as it is within a few minutes walking distance from park space, two elementary schools, one regional high school, our Borough Hall and public library, Crestwood Lake, our special needs housing communities, several houses of worship, our downtown retail and business district, and a New Jersey Transit commuter train. An additional benefit of this new community center would allow the Borough to offer adequate space during emergencies such as for warming/cooling stations, shelters/charging stations during storms or power outages, and a central community distribution site.

Federal Request: $3,500,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Broad Street Bridge

Proposed Recipient: Borough of Norwood, NJ

Recipient Address: 455 Broadway, Norwood, NJ 07648

Description of the Project: The Borough of Norwood is proposing the reconstruction of the Broad Street Bridge. This project would include installing a temporary cofferdam to create a safe working environment before dismantling the existing structure, including the four wiring walls. Then the bridge’s supporting structure will be rebuilt along with the bridge deck and parapets. The footings will either be repaired or replaced, especially the northern abutment as it is cracked. Steel reinforcements and concrete replacements will be placed within the structure to increase structural integrity. The drainage system for the bridge and roadway will be reconstructed within the same project to protect the bridge from further structural damage. Once the bridge is rebuilt, a 4’’ concrete sidewalk will be installed, and the road will be repaved. 

Federal Request: $1,000,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Water Department Filtration System

Proposed Recipient: Township of Mahwah, NJ - Water Department

Recipient Address: 475 Corporate Drive, Mahwah, NJ 07430

Description of the Project: The Mahwah Water Department provides water for about 25,000 residents living in the Mahwah Township area, New Jersey. Established in 1849, the Mahwah Water Department collects approximately 68.9% of its supply from underground and the remaining 31.1% supplied by Suez. The groundwater is pumped from seven wells located along the Ramapo River Valley-fill aquifer. One of Mahwah’s seven wells, Well #19 located at 680 Ramapo Valley Road, is out of compliance with regards to State standards for the levels of Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid (“PFOS”). The Department is required by the NJDEP to bring this Well into compliance with State standards by August of 2023. 

The Water Department has recently tasked its Water Utility Engineer with designing and implementing a filtration system which will remove these compounds from the Well. That process is now underway to determine which filtration system the Department will build. Unfortunately, this project will cost upwards of $950,000 to $1,000,000 - the cost of which will be borne by the rate payers/tax payers of the Township. While the water, when blended with all of the wells in our four water tanks is in compliance with these standards, the Department is required to bring this specific well into compliance. All six other wells are in compliance with State standards and do not need to be fitted with the filtration systems. 

Federal Request: $800,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Sewer Expansion Project

Proposed Recipient: Vernon Township, NJ

Recipient Address: 21 Church Street, Vernon, NJ 07462

Description of the Project: Vernon Township operates a wastewater system servicing over 1700 residents and business owners in its Town Center. The system consists of 46,000 LF of gravity sewer main, 17,000 LF of force main, three pump stations and five lift stations. The Sewer Service Area includes nearly 10 sq.miles of State designated Town Center, zoned mixed-use properties. The design of the system involved installation of gravity main sewers behind properties along the northern side of Route 94. While this did allow for a number of connections to the sewer system, it left out a large portion of eligible properties in the already approved Sewer Service area. The Vernon Township Sewer Expansion includes expansion of the existing sewer mains into areas that are already approved for sewer service, but were not serviced during the construction of mains over two decades ago. This would connect 75 properties. The project also includes expansion into expanded service areas that serve a residential community with aging septic systems. This second area includes over 200 properties. 

Federal Request: $6,800,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Storm Water Discharge Project

Proposed Recipient: City of Hackensack, NJ

Recipient Address: 65 Central Avenue, Hackensack, NJ 07601

Description of the Project: Last year the City commenced a multi-phase sewer separation effort along Clay Street. This project serves to primarily alleviate combined sewer surcharge in the area adjacent to the New Jersey Transit Pascack Valley Line Railroad, which contains low-lying topography in comparison to its surroundings and is also the location of one of the main trunk lines of the City’s combined sewer. 

This project will include the design and installation of separated storm and sanitary sewers along with the rehabilitation of existing sewers. The improvements will provide linear stormwater storage while reducing combined sewer surcharge and overflows and incorporating Green Infrastructure to meet water quality standards. The use of 1,600 linear feet of box culvert and an additional large diameter pipes will serve to not only separate the areas, but also to store stormwater and delay discharge to the Hackensack River. Prior to the flows being discharged, they will pass through both a previously installed manufactured treatment devices where suspended solids will be removed to satisfy NJDEP Water Quality Requirements and future Filterra tree well green infrastructure treatment devices.

Federal Request: $3,500,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Water Remediation

Proposed Recipient: Borough of Park Ridge - Park Ridge Water Department

Recipient Address: 55 Park Ave, Park Ridge, NJ 07656

Description of the Project: Park Ridge Water Department (PRWD) currently operates and maintains fourteen active treatment plants, primarily configured as individual well stations equipped with separation technology for perchlorate, arsenic, and/or volatile organic compounds, in addition to disinfectant and hardness sequestration chemical feeds. Currently, three (3) of these stations – Wells 12, 14, and 18 – have exhibited concentrations of the drinking water contaminant Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in excess of NJDEP’s maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 14 nanograms per liter (ng/L) or parts per trillion (ppt). The Borough requires the service of these wells to maintain its firm capacity and maintain sufficient supply against historic peak demands. In addition to these three, six other stations have detectable concentrations of PFOA which might require new or altered treatment to continue to meet the standards. 

The intent of this project is the design, permitting, and construction of water treatment systems for the removal of PFAS compounds from the drinking water supplied to the customers of Park Ridge Water. PFAS compounds are a large group of chemicals, which have been deemed “Forever Chemicals”. Treatment of PFAS requires the design and construction of specialized treatment systems. The treatment system types utilize either adsorption (GAC), absorption (Ion Exchange) or membrane filtration (Reverse Osmosis) for the removal of PFAS from the drinking water. Since the groundwater source used by Park Ridge comprises fourteen active treatment plants throughout the service area, the persistent of PFAS in the groundwater in this area will require potentially up to nine new or upgraded treatment systems to remove these compounds from the drinking water. 

Federal Request: $16,400,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Belle Avenue Drainage Improvements

Proposed Recipient: Township of Teaneck, NJ

Recipient Address: 818 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666

Description of the Project: The Township of Teaneck is requesting FY2023 Community Project Funding to complete Phase 1 of the drainage improvements along Belle Avenue and its surrounding streets. Located along the roadway are 20 single family homes which experience serious flooding during heavy rain events. This flooding occurs because the existing storm sewer pipe network throughout the drainage basin is inadequate and undersized to handle the entire conveyance of the drainage basin. The only outlet location to relieve the entire drainage basin, which is 1.77 miles long and 173 acres, is the outlet point at a ditch along the CSX railroad track at the southern end of the drainage basin. Preventing this flooding has been a priority of the Township for a long time and drainage studies have been conducted to discern the improvements that will be required to avoid future flooding. 

The overall goal of the Belle Avenue Improvement Project is to improve the stormwater conveyance system and minimize the flooding. This will be accomplished through upgrading the existing drainage system with a bigger size pipe network to handle the 25-year storm rainfall and the installation of an underground detention system in Sagamore Park and the Beverly Road parking lot. The Township plans to control the outflow through the installation of outlet control structures and bioswales. Green infrastructure will also be incorporated within the project to help absorb rainwater and further reduce the flooding that frequently occurs. The total cost of completing the Belle Avenue Improvement Project will be $3,052,070, with Phase 1 expected to cost $1,060,780. The proposed improvements will be for Phase 1 of the Belle Avenue Improvement Project. Phase 1 will involve the construction of the detention system at Sagamore Park. A cost estimate for Phase 1 completed by the Township’s engineers have been included with this request.  

Federal Request: $1,060,780

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Water Treatment Facility

Proposed Recipient: Borough of Fair Lawn, NJ

Recipient Address: 8-01 Fair Lawn Avenue, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410

Description of the Project: This project would create a new and improved water treatment facility for the entire borough of Fair Lawn. This facility would bring water from all wells and send it to a centralized water treatment plant. This treatment plant would produce potable water that meets both Primary and Secondary MCLs. Considerations would include ease of operation, reduction of costs, minimal site impacts, meeting all regulatory requirements. The new treatment plant should be able to treat up to 3.5 million gallons per day (3.5 MGD) with any one of the largest components out of service. New air stripping should be incorporated into the final design. Nanofiltration may be used to reduce the total hardness and some of the TDS. This process consists of membranes which can also remove some organic compounds and microbial contaminants. The nanofiltration membranes should follow the air stripping. The reject water from the membranes would be treated for PFAS and then discharged to the Passaic Valley Sewer Commission (PVSC) via the sewer system. 

The nanofiltration will remove up to 95% of the PFAS. Additional treatment would be needed for the removal of the remaining PFAS contaminants. This would include a special media that would require periodic removal, disposal, and replacement. Treatment will include the disinfection of the water. Optional zinc orthophosphate should be in place if needed in the future for corrosion control since the regulations have been getting stricter. Paint systems on water storage tanks typically last between 20 to 30 years. This should be considered for the finished facilities. The centralized plant located at Cadmus should include offices, laboratory testing, locker rooms and pumping equipment with all ancillary equipment such as computer control systems.  

Federal Request: $35,637,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: County Park/Road Cameras

Proposed Recipient: Bergen County Sheriff’s Office

Recipient Address: 2 Bergen County Plaza, Hackensack, NJ 07601

Description of the Project: The Bergen County Sheriff’s Office is requesting $953,500 for cameras to be placed in strategic points along county roads, mobile trailer mounted message boards, and cameras to assist the Sheriff’s office with policing the Bergen County Parks. The acquisition and instillation of 100 cameras placed in strategic points on County roads will provide the Sheriff’s Office with critical tools to maintain a presence at priority locations and provide an enhanced level of comfort for members of our community who are using the County Facilities. The purchase of trailer mounted message boards that will allow the Sheriff’s Office to better communicate with members of the public during emergency events. 

The requested equipment will continue keeping Bergen County safe and maintain its status as a premier location for families and businesses to flourish. The Bergen County Sheriff’s Office is the largest law enforcement agency in Bergen County, responsible for safeguarding a population of nearly 1 million residents, larger than that of many states. Comprised of more than 600 dedicated personnel, the Office's responsibilities include a broad range of services and functions which assist the public, augment the county's municipal police departments and safeguard Bergen's judicial proceedings. Responsible for assisting the county's 70 municipalities and its 68 municipal police departments by providing advanced forensic procedures through its Bureau of Criminal Investigation. The Sheriff’s Office provides patrol and protection of county roads, parks, and critical infrastructure as well as assists local law enforcement agencies throughout the county. 

Federal Request: $953,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Communications Equipment

Proposed Recipient: Borough of Bogota, NJ Police Department

Recipient Address: 75 Larch Avenue, Bogota, NJ 07603

Description of the Project: The Borough of Bogota is requesting $254,390.40 to support the purchase of compatible accessories that will replace the damaged two-way radio system for the use of the Bogota Police Department. During a severe storm on June 8, 2021, the Department’s two-way radio system was struck by lightning resulting in significant damage and remains in need of replacement. In response to this unforeseen damage, the Bergen County Department of Public Safety, Division of Communications has granted the Bogota Police Department permission to utilize the County’s Digital Trunk Radio System, under the condition that the Department contribute funding to purchase all compatible accessories necessary to support this replacement. 

The Department’s two-way radio system is an essential component of local law enforcement and public safety operations and is frequently used to support interagency communications between the Department, government agencies, and other emergency workers and first responders. Additionally, in the event of an injury or search and rescue operations, this system provides wide range capability and durability for harsh environments, allowing the Department to connect with other members in their unit, precinct, and supporting entities to better organize incident command. While the Department recognizes the critical importance of this communications system, it is simply unable to allocate any additional funding from our budget to support the purchase of this much needed equipment. The lack of an appropriate communications system continues to threaten the safety of our community. To adequately protect the life and property of the Borough, the Department is in dire need of funding to purchase new compatible accessories to support the replacement of our two-way radio system. 

Federal Request: $254,390.40

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: First Response Communications Equipment

Proposed Recipient: Township of Newton, NJ

Recipient Address: 39 Trinity Street, Newton, NJ 07860

Description of the Project: In partnership with the Township of Sparta, the Township of Hardyston, and the Township of Andover, the Town of Newton requests funding support to purchase updated, interoperable first response communications systems to answer 911 calls. This joint application will serve over 65,000 residents in Sussex County across four municipalities, allowing the project to have a wide reach and major positive impact in our communities and beyond. It is essential that these systems are updated collectively to ensure interoperability between these agencies that work together during response efforts. As a more rural county in comparison with the rest of the state, some of Sussex County’s municipalities are further apart and take longer distances to travel between. As a result, it is critical that all emergency services are reliable, efficient, and swift in their communications. 

The requested 911 interoperable emergency communications systems would bolster the responses of public safety agencies in Newton, Sparta, Hardyston, Andover, and beyond, and would ensure our communications are reliable for years to come. All technology will adhere to the required state and national standards. Without an effective central system to respond to 911 calls, our residents could be putting their lives and the lives of others at risk. Unfortunately, our current communications systems are technologically obsolete and are in dire need of modernization to meet current standards. In addition, our current systems experience gaps in coverage due to the wide geographical scope that our emergency response agencies cover. This prevents our emergency response teams and law enforcement agencies from effectively communicating with one another and responding to emergency situations as effectively as possible. The requested interoperable communications systems will bolster the responses of multiple public safety agencies throughout Sussex County and ensure our communications are efficient and reliable. 

Federal Request: $1,333,227.29

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Communications Equipment

Proposed Recipient: West Milford Township

Recipient Address: 1480 Union Valley Road, West Milford, NJ, 07480

Description of the Project: West Milford Township Emergency Services (Police, Fire, OEM, DPW) are in advanced stages of planning a comprehensive, state-of-the-art, emergency communications radio system to replace the antiquated system currently in use. Slated for Fiscal Year 2023, this “shovel-ready” project is designed to provide the critical infrastructure necessary to handle all events of an emergency, while enhancing safety of township first responders. Ultimately, the expected outcome of this project is to seamlessly handle all emergency events from a basic motor vehicle stop to a mass casualty incident. This project is on track to be executed Fiscal Year 2023. This project will take one year to complete. 

Federal Request: $2,892,905

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: Public Safety Complex

Proposed Recipient: Township of River Vale, NJ

Recipient Address: 406 Rivervale Road, River Vale, NJ 07675

Description of the Project: The Township of River Vale proposes to build a Public Safety Complex to house the Township’s Police Department. The Complex will serve as the primary location at which all police related coordination of information and resources to support incident management will take place for the entire municipality. The Township’s current facility was constructed in 1964, fifty-eight years ago, and has been changed and modified several times over the ensuing years to adaptively reuse space to conform to changing needs. In short, the site is constrained and expanding the facility is no longer an option. 

Specifically, the existing facility and site do not allow for secure staff parking, nor the ability to provide covered parking for police vehicles; there is no sallyport to bring suspects and detainees safely and security into and out of the facility, posing an acute safety hazard; the existing conditions of the facility's HVAC, plumbing, power, sewage systems and roof mean the Township is paying a high premium in maintenance and operating costs to keep the facility in its current configuration. More detail regarding the current facility’s shortcomings and the need for a new facility to house the Township's Police Department are included in the attached Community Support document. The proposed facility will serve as a central law enforcement facility for the entire municipality. The Township requests $2,000,000 for costs associated with Architecture, Engineering, Construction Management, and other costs directly related to the project.  

Federal Request: $2,000,000

Link to Member Financial Certification.

 


 

Project Name: In-Room Sensor Technology

Proposed Recipient: The Valley Hospital

Recipient Address: 223 N Van Dien Avenue, Ridgewood, New Jersey, 07450

Description of the Project: The Valley Hospital, a non-profit community hospital, launched a 28-bed pilot project in October 2021 employing AUGi devices, an innovative technology, combining a state of the art in-room sensor, which leverages artificial intelligence to monitor patient movement and behavior within their environment. It predicts high-risk behavior and pushes warnings directly to the front-line caregiver. Upon review of the first 3 full months of deployment, the pilot unit realized a 40% reduction in total falls, with no serious injuries. Of interest, this occurred during the Omicron surge in addition to a preexisting regional staffing shortage. The pilot unit also cared for patients with the highest acuity level in comparison to all other medical surgical units during the same time period. This illustrates the power of this novel technology in the healthcare space. 

In 2023, with the support of federal funding, Valley intends to bring the deployment of AUGi devices to a total 148 beds across several units, including surgical, oncology, cardiac and orthopedics, fully deploying this technology hospital-wide. Valley is the only hospital in NJ that is deploying this technology and approach to mitigate the risk of falls. As part of this next phase of the project, AUGi base stations will be installed near each bed and will relay clinical insight, intelligently derived from a patient’s digital and physical environment directly to staff. Advanced sensors, artificial intelligence, and machine learning will detect when a patient is at risk of falling and will notify appropriate staff members via a mobile application allowing them to quickly respond. Further, AUGi’s safety protocol compliance features ensure that staff are maintaining appropriate clinical workflow such as hourly rounding and bedside reporting to reduce patients falls. In addition, an AUGi web portal will allow clinical leaders to gain insight into patient and staff behavioral data that has never before been possible.  

Federal Request: $608,860

Link to Member Financial Certification.


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Please find last year's Community Project Funding information here: 2021 Community Project Funding

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FY2023 NDAA COMMUNITY PROJECT FUNDING SUBMISSION

Project Name: Port Murray Readiness Center Micro-Grid System

Project Sponsor: New Jersey Department of Military and Veteran's Affairs (DMAVA)

Location of Project: 550 Rt 57, Port Murray, NJ 07865

Project Purpose: 

The New Jersey Department of Military and Veteran's Affairs (NJDMAVA) has proposed a 114 kilowatt (kW) photovoltaic (PV) system capable of supplying up to 80 percent of the Readiness Center’s average annual electric power consumption.  This PV system would be elevated as a carport within an existing parking lot.  The PV system will be linked to an on-site battery bank capable of storing up to 72-hours of available operational energy (kWh) providing resilient back-up power generation.  Finally, the PV carport will be complimented by two Level-2 (11 kW) electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, anticipating the transition to EVs in the State and Federal fleet.  This entire system comprises a micro grid, a localized energy system capable of producing, storing and distributing energy entirely on site.

This micro-grid project would be an innovative first for DMAVA and represents the next step of storing electrical energy on-site for later use. This is in keeping with the Army’s goal of pursuing enough renewable energy generation and battery storage capacity to self-sustain its critical missions on all its installations by 2040 [February 2022 United States Army Climate Strategy]. This resilient component will allow the facility to remain powered for the critical first 72-hours of a power outage and the Readiness Center to remain mission capable. The proposed EV chargers will expand the current network into Warren County for the first time.

Justification: 

Consistent with Executive Order 14008, Executive Order 14057, the Report on Effects of a Changing Climate to the Department of Defense and Department of Defense Climate Adaptation Plan, the NJ Army National Guard (ARNG) recognizes and is leaning into plans to decrease its facilities’ dependence on fossil fuels and increase resiliency - the ability to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to changing conditions and withstand, respond to, and recover rapidly from disruptions [DODD 4715.21, Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience]. The effects of a changing climate are a national security issue with potential impacts to Department of Defense and NJARNG missions, operational plans, and installations.  To achieve these goals, the DoD must be able to adapt current and future operations to address the impacts of a variety of threats and conditions, including those from weather and natural events.

Federal Request: $1,706,174

Link to Member Financial Certification.